the ledge files
the ledge - nl - uk
new
search
conversations
books
Being Your Own Friend

Wilhelm Schmid
Querido, Amsterdam,

originally appeared as:
Mit sich selbst befreundet sein
2004, publisher: Suhrkamp, Frankfurt am Main



Other excerpts

excerpt:
Walking Into the Night
Olaf Olafsson

excerpt:
Vita
Melania Mazzucco

excerpt:
Campfire
Julia Franck

excerpt:
Under the Volcano
Malcolm Lowry

excerpt:
Reading &cetera
Pieter Steinz

excerpt:
Don Quixote
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

excerpt:
Homecoming
Natasha Radojcic

excerpt:
The One-Room Schoolhouse
Jim Heynen

excerpt:
The Egyptologist
Arthur Phillips

excerpt:
Prague
Arthur Phillips

excerpt:
The Diary of Géza Csáth
Géza Csáth

excerpt:
Lost in the City
Edward P. Jones

excerpt:
The Known World
Edward P. Jones

excerpt:
Zorro
Isabel Allende

excerpt:
The Last Window Giraffe
Péter Zilahy

excerpt:
The Sea
John Banville

excerpt:
Uncle Tom's Cabin
Harriet Beecher Stowe

excerpt:
Ragtime
E.L. Doctorow

excerpt:
The Fifty Year Sword
Mark Z. Danielewski

excerpt:
American Purgatorio
John Haskell

excerpt:
The Restless Supermarket
Ivan Vladislavic

excerpt:
Envy
Kathryn Harrison

excerpt:
Watt
Samuel Beckett

excerpt:
Bitter Fruit
Achmat Dangor

excerpt:
Kreutzer Sonata
Leo N. Tolstoy

excerpt:
Journey to the End of the Night
Louis-Ferdinand Céline

excerpt:
Embers
Sándor Márai

excerpt:
Being Your Own Friend
Wilhelm Schmid

excerpt:
The Gaze
Elif Shafak

excerpt:
Atonement
Ian McEwan

excerpt:
In Babylon
Marcel Möring

excerpt:
Pavel & I
Dan Vyleta

excerpt:
Black Mamba Boy
Nadifa Mohamed

excerpt:
Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk
David Sedaris



the ledge - flash version*

*
English

BEING YOUR OWN FRIEND — WILHELM SCHMID

Shaping the face: On the plastic propensity of life

Like a sculptor, the self shapes itself and its life: that is more or less how Epictetus (Diatribes I, 15) viewed the art of living. The art of living, however, also demands a reversal of this relationship. The ‘artist’ changes sides so that ‘life,' taking on the role of the sculptor, may shape the self. This would explain why many a self appears to others to have been carved in stone. Who did the handiwork? Evidently life itself has a plastic propensity, employing as its tools the experiences, encounters, longings, disappointments, pain and desires it imparts. It accentuates the fullness of the lips or purses them into a thin line; it turns up the corners of the mouth into a smile or turns them down morosely, it lifts up the eyebrows in surprise and allows weary eyelids to droop; it creates lines and wrinkles in the forehead, engraving them there over time depending on the frequency with which the muscles concealed beneath are used. Use inevitably has a long term effect on the appearance of the human being, on the face and on the bearing, on movements and gestures. All of life, even the absence of life, leaves its mark upon the face.
1.

 
BEING YOUR OWN FRIEND — WILHELM SCHMID

A face that remains too smooth - too smooth for a fulfilled life that embraces its wrinkles, indicators of life’s rich landscape - might well be viewed with suspicion.
The face, more so than a name, is the property of the self, and yet it is rarely inhabited by the self alone. As individuated as its lines may be, they are also ‘culturally constructed,' permeated by the culture of a region and an epoch: a mere glance at gestures and facial expressions allows us to place a face in a particular time and space. The face speaks, even when no sound comes out of the mouth, and it receives a reply, even when nothing is said. Emmanuel Lévinas had good reasons for basing an entire ethics around the face, for any interactive ethics remains abstract if one cannot see the face. A hermeneutics of the face expounds facial signs, offers an individual and a cultural interpretation of the features from which sadness and happiness, despondency and acuity speak. Hardship, pain, disappointment, forbidden desires and irreconcilable hatred imbue themselves deeply in the face. Viewed from the outside, the face weaves the conflicting aspects of the self into a unity that may not exist as such on the inside, and behind many a face is a hidden volcano threatening to erupt.
2.

 
BEING YOUR OWN FRIEND — WILHELM SCHMID

The face is that physical and spiritual part of the self presented to others in a state of undress. It protects itself by becoming an almost impenetrable mask - even for the self, which sometimes sees a stranger when it catches sight of itself in the mirror. The self learns to live with two faces: a ‘true’ face revealed only to a few people, and one which is ‘put on’, and occasionally gets lost, leading to a ‘loss of face.'
Shaping the facial features in an indirect rather than a direct fashion is the essence of the art of the face. Shaping the face by direct means would require cosmetic tools and surgical procedures, and even schooling one’s facial expressions to bring the face ‘into line.' Shaping the face by indirect means, on the other hand, requires the self to exert influence over the constellation of its life, which in turn will have an effect on its constitution: encounters are sought out intentionally for the benefits gained from spending time with certain people; situations are steered towards the production of desirable experiences; one adopts an attitude commensurate with those things with which the self must come to terms. Certain feelings will be favoured as a result, others held in check, leaving their own imprint on the soul which, in turn, will leave its mark upon the face - a path from the inside to the outside to the inside.
3.

 
BEING YOUR OWN FRIEND — WILHELM SCHMID

And yet the starting point lies within the self, which makes room for the passions, allowing joy to pour forth, for example, and which reins in affectations so that they do not distort the face with envy. The self clarifies and balances power relations within itself, and the nature of these, in turn, attracts certain people and situations but not others. This is true ‘cosmetic surgery,' and one sees its effects upon the face. In this manner the self allows life to go to work while remaining the sculptor of itself - secretly, admittedly, a secret not only to others, but often to itself, hoping in this way to unburden itself of responsibility for its own face. A conscious way of life, however, consists of working on one’s face, summoning up and exerting a whole repertoire of habits with long term effects. ‘Slow and petty, all these cures,’ said Nietzsche (The Dawn, 462), but ‘he who wishes to heal his soul must consider changing the smallest of habits.’

translation: Chantal Wright
4.


Deutsch

MIT SICH SELBST BEFREUNDET SEIN — WILHELM SCHMID


Gestaltung des Gesichts: Von der plastischen Kraft des Lebens

Wie ein Bildhauer gestaltet das Selbst sich und sein Leben: So stellte etwa Epiktet (Diatriben I, 15)
sich die Lebenskunst vor. Aber zur Kunst des Lebens gehört ebenso die Umkehrung dieser Beziehung: Der "Künstler" wechselt die Seite, und nun gestaltet "das Leben" ganz wie ein Bildhauer das Selbst. Nur so ist zu erklären, dass manch ein Selbst wie aus Stein gemeißelt einem anderen vor Augen steht. Wer hat an ihm gearbeitet? Offenkundig verfügt "das Leben" selbst über plastische Kraft, und das Werkzeug, mit dem es arbeitet, sind die Erfahrungen, Begegnungen, Sehnsüchte, Enttäuschungen, Schmerzen, Lüste, die es vermittelt. So vermag es die Linien der Lippen zu schürzen zu einem vollen Mund oder zu begradigen zu einem feinen Strich; es biegt die Mundwinkel lächelnd nach oben oder verdrießlich nach unten; es hebt die Augenbrauen staunend hoch und lässt die Augenlider müde niedersinken; Fältchen und Falten zieht es über die Stirn und gräbt sie im Laufe der Zeit ein, je nach Frequenz des Gebrauchs der darunter verborgenen Muskeln. Unweigerlich wirkt der Gebrauch über längere Zeit gestaltend auf die Erscheinungsform des Menschen ein, auf sein Gesicht wie auf seine Haltung, seine Bewegung und Gestik.
1.

 
MIT SICH SELBST BEFREUNDET SEIN — WILHELM SCHMID

Alles Leben zeichnet sich ab im Gesicht, auch die
Abwesenheit von Leben. Angesichts dessen könnte ein Problem darin zu sehen sein, wenn das Gesicht zu glatt bleibt, zu glatt für ein erfülltes Leben, das eher die Falten liebt: In ihnen zeichnet sich die reiche Landschaft des Lebens ab.

In höherem Maße als ein Name ist das Gesicht Eigentum des Selbst, und doch wird es kaum von ihm allein bewohnt. So individuell seine Linienführungen auch sein mögen, so sehr sind sie doch "kulturell konstruiert", durchdrungen von der Kultur einer Region und einer Epoche: Der bloße Blick auf die Mimik erlaubt bisweilen, das Gesicht einem Raum und einer Zeit zuzuordnen. Es spricht, auch wenn aus dem Mund kein Laut kommt, und es erhält Antwort, auch wenn nichts gesagt wird. Emmanuel Lévinas hatte gute Gründe dafür, eine ganze Ethik auf das Antlitz zu gründen, denn alle Ethik im Umgang mit anderen bleibt abstrakt, wenn deren Gesicht nicht sichtbar ist. Eine Hermeneutik des Gesichts versteht die Zeichen zu deuten, die Gesichtszüge kulturell und individuell zu interpretieren, aus denen Traurigkeit und Fröhlichkeit, Niedergeschlagenheit und Wachheit sprechen. Härten, Schmerzen, Enttäuschungen, verbotene Wünsche und unversöhnlicher Hass graben sich tief darin ein.
2.

 
MIT SICH SELBST BEFREUNDET SEIN — WILHELM SCHMID

Nach außen hin fügt das Gesicht die divergenten Aspekte des Selbst zu einer Einheit zusammen, die es im Inneren so vielleicht nicht gibt, und hinter manch einem Gesicht kocht ein verborgener Vulkan. Körperlich wie seelisch handelt es sich um den Teil des Selbst, der anderen
nackt dargeboten wird. Das Gesicht schützt sich, indem es zur Maske wird, die kaum zu durchschauen ist, zuweilen auch nicht für das Selbst, das sich einem Fremden gegenübersieht, wenn es sich im Spiegel erblickt. So beginnt das Selbst mit zwei Gesichtern zu leben: einem "wahren", das nur wenige zu sehen bekommen, und einem "aufgesetzten", das gelegentlich verloren werden kann, sodass ein "Gesichtsverlust" die Folge ist.

Die Gesichtszüge zu gestalten, weniger auf direkte als auf indirekte Weise: darin besteht die Kunst des Gesichts. Eine direkte Gestaltung bedürfte kosmetischer Mittel und operativer Eingriffe, auch einer Einübung des Ausdrucks, um das Gesicht "in Stellung zu bringen". Bei der indirekten Gestaltung hingegen nimmt das Selbst Einfluss auf die Konstellation seines Lebens, die auf seine Konstitution zurückwirkt: Begegnungen werden vorsätzlich gesucht, um das Zusammensein mit bestimmten Menschen auf sich wirken zu lassen; Situationen lassen sich gezielt ansteuern, um wünschenswerte Erfahrungen zu machen; die Haltung ist festzulegen, die hinsichtlich dessen, womit das Selbst "fertig werden muss", eingenommen werd en kann.
3.

 
MIT SICH SELBST BEFREUNDET SEIN — WILHELM SCHMID

Bestimmte Gefühle werden dadurch begünstigt, andere eingedämmt; sie prägen ihrerseits die Seele, die wiederum im Gesicht zum Vorschein kommt -
ein Weg also von außen nach innen nach außen. Der Ausgangspunkt liegt jedoch im Inneren des Selbst, das Leidenschaften Raum gibt, um etwa eine Freude aufleben zu lassen, und Affekte mäßigt, damit nicht etwa ein Neid zu sehr das Gesicht verzerrt. Es klärt die Machtverhältnisse in sich und balanciert sie aus, deren Verfassung wiederum bestimmte Menschen und Situationen anzieht, andere nicht: Dies sind die wahren "Schönheitsoperationen", die letztlich im Gesicht zum Tragen kommen. So lässt das Selbst das Leben arbeiten und ist doch der Bildhauer seiner selbst - wenn auch auf verschwiegene Weise, verschwiegen oftmals nicht nur anderen, sondern auch sich selbst, denn so glaubt es sich der Anstrengung enthoben, entlastet von der Verantwortung für das eigene Gesicht. Die bewusste Lebensführung aber besteht darin, an dessen Gestaltung selbst zu arbeiten und dazu ein ganzes Repertoire an Gewohnheiten aufzubieten und einzurichten, das auf lange Frist prägend wirkt. "Langsam und kleinlich sind alle diese Curen", meinte schon Nietzsche (Morgenröte, 462); aber "auch wer seine Seele heilen will, soll über die Veränderung der kleinsten Gewohnheiten nachdenken.
4.

 
MIT SICH SELBST BEFREUNDET SEIN — WILHELM SCHMID

"
5.


     
The Ledge
editor-in-chief: Stacey Knecht, info@the-ledge.com
Thanks to: De digitale pioniers and
Het Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds
Design: Maurits de Bruijn

Copyright: Pieter Steinz, Stacey Knecht
All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical means, including information storage and retrieval systems, without permission in writing from the author.