the ledge files
the ledge - nl - uk
new
search
conversations
books
Campfire

Julia Franck
Querido, Amsterdam, not yet available in English

originally appeared as:
Lagerfeuer
2003,



Other excerpts

excerpt:
Walking Into the Night
Olaf Olafsson

excerpt:
Vita
Melania Mazzucco

excerpt:
Campfire
Julia Franck

excerpt:
Under the Volcano
Malcolm Lowry

excerpt:
Reading &cetera
Pieter Steinz

excerpt:
Don Quixote
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

excerpt:
Homecoming
Natasha Radojcic

excerpt:
The One-Room Schoolhouse
Jim Heynen

excerpt:
The Egyptologist
Arthur Phillips

excerpt:
Prague
Arthur Phillips

excerpt:
The Diary of Géza Csáth
Géza Csáth

excerpt:
Lost in the City
Edward P. Jones

excerpt:
The Known World
Edward P. Jones

excerpt:
Zorro
Isabel Allende

excerpt:
The Last Window Giraffe
Péter Zilahy

excerpt:
The Sea
John Banville

excerpt:
Uncle Tom's Cabin
Harriet Beecher Stowe

excerpt:
Ragtime
E.L. Doctorow

excerpt:
The Fifty Year Sword
Mark Z. Danielewski

excerpt:
American Purgatorio
John Haskell

excerpt:
The Restless Supermarket
Ivan Vladislavic

excerpt:
Envy
Kathryn Harrison

excerpt:
Watt
Samuel Beckett

excerpt:
Bitter Fruit
Achmat Dangor

excerpt:
Kreutzer Sonata
Leo N. Tolstoy

excerpt:
Journey to the End of the Night
Louis-Ferdinand Céline

excerpt:
Embers
Sándor Márai

excerpt:
Being Your Own Friend
Wilhelm Schmid

excerpt:
The Gaze
Elif Shafak

excerpt:
Atonement
Ian McEwan

excerpt:
In Babylon
Marcel Möring

excerpt:
Pavel & I
Dan Vyleta

excerpt:
Black Mamba Boy
Nadifa Mohamed

excerpt:
Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk
David Sedaris



the ledge - flash version*

*
English

CAMPFIRE — JULIA FRANCK

The children let their arms drop tiredly, they had waved unflaggingly, at first full of enthusiasm despite the lack of response, then probably out of habit and childish ambition, they had waved for a good hour, had pressed their mouths to the windows, leaving behind, upon the steamed-up windows, the outline of wet kisses, had rubbed their noses against the windows, they had waved until Katja said to her brother, “I can’t any more, come on, let’s stop”, and Aleksej nodded, as though it was good to finally give up, good to put an end to the goodbye. The car moved us forward again a little, the brake lights of the small delivery van in front of us went out. Under the flat building that bridged the street, in the twilight, stood a man in uniform who motioned us to come closer, only to throw both arms up into the air the next instant. We stopped with a shudder, the engine stuttered and died. It had gone on like this for four hours, we may have covered three metres in those four hours, maybe ten. The Bornholmer Bridge had to be a few metres in front of us, that I knew, but we couldn’t see it, the narrow carriageway led through a long, plain building that concealed everything ahead. The small delivery van was waved aside and guided into a neighbouring carriageway.
1.

 
CAMPFIRE — JULIA FRANCK

The streetlights flickered and lit up one after the other. In the row on the right, one of them remained dark. I asked myself when they found time for repairs here. Maybe at night, between twelve and two. You could see the shadow in front of us, growing closer, until it disappeared under the bonnet; shortly afterwards it scaled the bonnet, crawled over the windscreen up our faces, and finally swallowed the car, it inconsiderately swallowed everything that lay in front of it, that shadow of the long roof, of the building that bridged the road and took away our view. A building made entirely of cardboard and corrugated iron. Until the sun up ahead sank between the buildings, then shone one more time in the window of the watchtower high above us, as though she were tempting us, promising that we would see her again tomorrow, in the west, if we only followed her, and then she was gone, leaving us here in the dusk with a few streaks in the sky, and the shadows were not only swallowing us, but the whole city at our backs, when Gerd stubbed out his cigarette, took a deep breath, held it in and said to me, he had asked himself ten years ago when I would finally come, he whistled through his teeth almost in passing, but back then I had just met that person and today he was in a position to tell me, now that I was sitting in his car and my path only led in this one direction, and I couldn’t get out any more, at which point he laughed, he had always imagined holding me in his arms naked.
2.

 
CAMPFIRE — JULIA FRANCK


Gerd lit another cigarette, his tongue wrapped around the filter from below, he switched on the engine, turned it off, switched it on again, the ashtray spilled over, I scraped out the stubs with my bare hands and stuffed them in a small plastic bag that I had brought along thinking that the kids might be sick. I was the one who was sick now. I didn’t want to be naked in Gerd’s arms. I had successfully fought off the idea up until just now, when he had made my efforts seem ridiculous with a slight whistle through his teeth and a few harmless words. Even the fact that I was in his car, my kids were sitting on the back seat kissing the windows and we were about to drive over this bridge didn’t make it exciting.
Katja held her nose and asked if she could open the window. I nodded and ignored Gerd’s groan. For a long time I had thought Gerd didn’t make me listen to his wishes out of consideration and in the knowledge that I didn’t want to be touched by him. Then I hoped he had forgotten my body, to the best of his ability. So he wasn’t that good at it, but at least he had made an effort. An effort I’d appreciated, now an effort that he wasn’t even making, or that was falling apart at that very moment.
3.

 
CAMPFIRE — JULIA FRANCK

That person whose name he had certainly not forgotten but would not utter had become the father of my children. But that wasn’t the reason why Gerd suddenly disgusted me. It disgusted me that he didn’t want to see why we were sitting in his car. We were sitting in his car just to get over this bridge, maybe there was another reason as well, but it was definitely not so we could sit together undisturbed in a confined space. Cool air moved in from the outside, it smelled of petrol and a little bit of summer, more of night already and approaching cold. Dusk. A man in police uniform came up to the car, he bent down on Gerd’s side so that he could see inside the car more easily. His torch scattered some light on our faces, it glimmered weakly and flickered, as though it might go out at any minute. He checked our names and faces one after the other. I looked back into a pale face with a low, wide forehead, the eyes were deep-set and were forced right back into their sockets by the cheekbones, a Pomeranian face that did not look that young any more, even though it still was. He knocked on the back door with his torch and said we couldn’t stand here with open windows. The windows had to stay closed for security reasons.
4.

 
CAMPFIRE — JULIA FRANCK

After he had checked Katja and Aleksej’s documents too, he said, “Get out”. My door jammed, I shook it until it sprang open, and got out.
“No,” the man in police uniform called out to me over the roof, “not you, just the children”.
I got back into the car and turned around, “You have to get out,” I repeated and reached for Aleksej’s hand as I said it, held it tight. He pulled away. My hand slipped into emptiness. It was only now that I noticed I was shaking. The doors banged shut. The man said something to my children that I couldn’t make out, he pointed to our car, shook his head and clapped Aleksej on his narrow shoulders, then I saw them following him and disappearing into the low building. A neon lamp shone over the dark window. I waited for a light to go on, but the window remained dark. Maybe there was a blind on the inside. Or you were prevented from seeing in by a special coating. You could only look out from the inside, just like the copper windows of the Palast der Republik. The king looked out and could observe his people, while the people outside looked at blind windows and, dazzled by their glare, were unable to see through. Had they been on a height with the king and his windows, on eye level with the reflection, they would at least have been able to see themselves, been permitted to meet their blatantly curious gaze.
5.

 
CAMPFIRE — JULIA FRANCK

But they were standing down there, the little people, on the square. And up in the panes nothing but the sky was reflected. The gaze was not returned. But the panes of this particular window were especially black, deep black, coal black, raven black, the longer I looked over, the more unnatural it seemed. No gleam, no orange. All light long soaked up. No raven, no coal, no depth. Just blackness. The window must be nothing but a dummy. Gerd stubbed out his cigarette and lit another one.
“It’s nice when it’s quiet.” He was enjoying the minutes spent alone with me. They’ll ask Katja and Aleksej why we want to go over, they’ll take each one of them into a windowless room, sit the child on a chair and say, We want to know something, and you have to tell us the truth, do you hear? And Katja will nod, and Aleksej will look at his shoes. He’ll clap him on the back as he does it, like a friend, a colleague, a confidante. And won’t know that Aleksej, even if he raises his head, only has blurred vision because his glasses aren’t much good any more. He liked to look down at his shoes, they were the things that were located furthest away from his eyes and still belonged to him, he knew exactly what his shoes looked like.
6.

 
CAMPFIRE — JULIA FRANCK

Maybe the official will threaten him, maybe he’ll pull at his arm so that Aleksej doesn’t forget how much stronger people like him are. Maybe three of them were standing in front of Aleksej. Five of them, the whole room could be full of state servants in uniform, regular policemen, members of the Staatssicherheit, border police, the upper echelons, apprentices, helpers – but then the individual would lose authority. What does your mother want over there? How long has she known this man? Does she love this man? Have you seen him kissing her? And she kissing him? How do they kiss? Do you want a father like that, from the West? Did he bring you presents? What did he bring? So he’s a capitalist. Isn’t he? Silence. What could Aleksej reply to that? There were only wrong answers. Something licked at the bottom of my spine, I could call it fear, but it was only a lick. Wrong answers. Aleksej didn’t even know that, maybe he sensed it. Are they going to arrest us? What was the point of the paperwork, the permission, if they just let me disappear completely and threw the children into a home? Forced adoption. There were rumours about that. Particularly enemies of the state, but enemies of socialist democracy too, and particularly those who took off, fled, those were the ones whose children were taken into the state’s protection.
7.

 
CAMPFIRE — JULIA FRANCK

Never to return and never to be found.

translation: Chantal Wright

8.


Deutsch

LAGERFEUER — JULIA FRANCK


Die Kinder ließen müde ihre Arme sinken, ausdauernd hatten sie gewunken, zuerst voller Begeisterung und trotz fehlender Erwiderung, dann wohl aus Gewohnheit und kindlichem Ehrgeiz, bestimmt eine Stunde lang hatten sie gewunken, die Münder an die Scheiben gedr”ckt, wo sie feuchte Kußränder auf den beschlagenen Scheiben hinterließen, die Nasen an den Scheiben gerieben, sie hatten gewunken, bis Katja zu ihren Bruder sagte: ‘Ich kann nicht mehr, komm, wir hören auf’, und Aleksej nickte, als se es gut, endlich aufzugeben, gut, dem Abschied ein Ende zu setzen. Der Wagen brachte uns erneut ein Stück voran, die Bremslichter des kleinen Lieferwagens vor uns erloschen. Unter dem flachen Überbau stnad im Zwielicht ein Mann in Uniform, der uns bedeutete, näher zu kommen, um sogleich beide Arme in die Luft zu reißen. Ruckartig hielten wir, der Motor stotterte und soff ab. Seit vier Stunden ging es so voran, vielleicht hatten wir drei Meter zurückgelegt in diesen vier Stunden, vielleicht zehn. Wenige Meter vor uns mußte die Bornholmer Brücke liegen, das wußte ich, nur sehen konnten wir sie nicht, ein breites einfaches Gebäude, durch das die schmale Fahrbahn führte, verdeckte die Sicht auf alles Kommende.
1.

 
LAGERFEUER — JULIA FRANCK

Der kleine Lieferwagen wurde zur Seite gewunken und in eine benachbarte Fahrbahn gelotst. Die Laternen flackerten und gingen eine nach der anderen an. In der rechten Reihe blieb eine dunkel. Ich fragte mich, wann an diesem Ort Zeit für Reparaturen wäre. Vielleicht nachts zwischen zwölf und zwei. Mann konnte dem Schatten vor uns zusehen, wie er sich näherte, bis er unter der Motorhaube verschwand, kurz darauf die Motorhaube erklomm, über die Windschutzscheibe kroch, auf unsere Gesichter, und schließlich den Wagen verschluckte, rücksichtslos, wie er alles verschluckte, was vor ihm lag, der Schatten jenes breiten Daches, des Gebäudes, das die Fahrbahn überbrückte und uns die Sicht nahm. Ein Gebäude ganz aus Pappe und Wellblech. Bis die Sonne uns voran zwischen den Häusern versank und noch einmal in der Fensterscheibe des Wachturms hoch über uns aufleuchtete, als wolle sie uns locken und versprechen, daß wir sie schon morgen wiedersähen, im Westen, wenn wir ihr nur folgten, und weg war sie und ließ uns hier in der Dämmerung mit ein paar Feuerstreifen am Himmel stehen, und die Schatten schluckten nicht nur uns, sondern die ganze Stadt in unserem Rücken, als Gerd seine Zigarette ausdrückte, tief einatmete, die Luft anhielt und zu mir sagte, er habe schon vor zehn Jahren gefragt, wann ich endlich kommen würde, wie beiläufig pfiff er durch die Zähne, aber damals sei ich gerade erst auf diesen Menschen getroffen und heute könne er es mir sagen, jetst, da ich in seinem Auto säße und mein Weg ja nur noch diese eine Richtung kenne, ich auch nicht mehr aussteigen könne, wobei er lachte, er habe sich immer vorgestellt, mich nackt in den Armen zu halten.
2.

 
LAGERFEUER — JULIA FRANCK


Gerd steckte sich eine neue Zigarette an, seine Zunge umfaßte von unten den Filter, er zündete den Motor, stellte ihn ab, zündete ihn erneut, der Aschenbecher quoll über, ich sammelte die Stummel mit der bloßen Hand heraus und stopfte sie in eine kleine Plastetüte, die ich vorsorglich mitgenommen hatte, falls den Kindern schlecht würde. Schlecht war jetzt mir. In Gerds Armen wollte ich nicht nackt sein. Gegen die Vorstellung hatte ich mich erfolgreich gewehrt, bis zu diesem Augenblick, in dem er meine Bemühung mit einem leichten Pfeifen durch die Zähne und ein paar harmlosen Worten lächerlich machte. Selbst der Umstand, daß ich mich in seinem Auto befand, meine Kinder auf seiner Rückbank saßen, die Scheiben küßten und wir im Begriff waren, über diese Brücke zu fahren, machte es nicht aufregend.
Katja hielt sich die Nase zu und fragte, ob sie das Fenster öffnen könne. Ich nickte und überhörte Gerds Stöhnen. Lange hatte ich gedacht, Gerd erspare mir das Anhören seiner Wünsche aus Rücksicht und mit dem Wissen, daß ich keine Berührung von ihm wollte. Dann wieder hoffte ich, er habe meinen Körper vergessen, so gut es ging. Also schlecht vielleicht, aber immerhin ein Versuch. Ein Versuch, für den ich ihn geschätzt hatte, ein Versuch nun, den er gar nicht unternahm, oder der in diesem Augenblick scheiterte.
3.

 
LAGERFEUER — JULIA FRANCK

Dieser Mensch, dessen Namen er ganz sicher nicht vergessen hatte, den er aber nicht in den Mund nahm, war der Vater meiner Kinder geworden. Aber das war nicht der Grund, warum mich Gerd plötzlich ekelte. Es ekelte mich, daß er nicht bemerken wollte, warum wir in seinem Wagen saßen. Nur, um diese Brucke zu passieren, saßen wir in seinem Wagen, vielleicht gab es noch einen anderen Grund, aber keineswegs den, mal ungestört auf kleinstem Raum beisammen zu sitzen. Von draußen zog kühle Luft herein, es roch nach Benzin und ein wenig nach Sommer, eher schon nach Nacht und bevorstehender Kälte. Dämmerung. Ein Mann in Polizeiuniform kam zum Wagen, er beugte sich an Gerds Seite herab, um besser ins Innere des Wagens schauen zu können. Seine Taschenlampe streute etwas Licht über unsere Gesichter, schwach glomm sie und flakkerte, als wolle sie jeden Augenblick erlöschen. Der Reihe nach prüfte er Namen und Gesichter. Ich blickte zurück in ein fahles Gesicht mit einer niedrigen, breiten Stirn, die Augen saßen tief und wurden von den Wangenknochen ganz in ihre Höhlen gedrängt, ein pommersches Gesicht, das nicht mehr jugendlich aussah, obwohl es das noch war. Mit der Taschenlampe klopfte er an die hintere Tür und sagte, wir dürften hier nicht mit offenen Fenstern stehen.
4.

 
LAGERFEUER — JULIA FRANCK

Die Fenster müßten aus Sicherheitsgründen geschlossen bleiben. Nachdem er auch die Dokumente von Katja und Aleksej überprüft hatte, sagte er: ‘Aussteigen.’ Meine Tür klemmte, ich rüttelte an ihr, bis sie aufsprang, und stieg aus.
‘Nein,’ rief mir der Mann in Polizeiuniform über das Dach hinweg zu, ‘nicht Sie, nur die Kinder.’
Ich setzte mich wieder zurück ins Auto und drehte mich um: ‘Ihr sollt aussteigen,’ wiederholte ich und faßte gleichzeitig nach Aleksejs Hand, hielt sie fest. Er machte sich los. Meine Hand rutschte ins Leere. Erst jetzt bemerkte ich mein Zittern. Die Türen schlugen zu. Der Mann sagte etwas zu meinen Kindern, was ich nicht verstand, er zeigte auf unser Auto, schüttelte den Kopf un klopfte Aleksej auf die schmale Schulter, dann sah ich, wie sie ihm folgten und in dem Flachbau verschwanden. Über dem dunklen Fenster brannte eine Neonlampe. Ich wartete, daß ein Licht anging, aber das Fenster blieb schwarz. Vielleicht gab es innen ein Rollo. Oder eine besondere Beschichtung verhinderte, daß man hineinsehen konnte. Nur von innen war es m”glich, hinauszusehen – wie durch die kupfernen Scheiben im Palast der Republik. Der König sah hinaus und konnte sein Volk beobachten, während die Menschen draußen auf blinde Scheiben blickten und geblendet von deren Glanz nicht hindurchsehen konnten.
5.

 
LAGERFEUER — JULIA FRANCK

Wären sie auf einer Höhe mit dem König und seinen Scheiben, auf Augenhöhe der ‘Spiegelung, hätten sie zumindest sich selbst sehen k”nnen, ihrem unverhohlen neugierigen Blick begegnen dürfen. Nur standen sie unten, die kleinen Leute, auf dem Platz. Und oben in den Scheiben spiegelte sich nichts als Himmel. Es gab keine Erwiderung des Blickes. Aber die Scheiben dieses Fensters hier waren besonders schwarz, tiefschwarz, kohlschwarz, rabenschwarz, je länger ich hinübersah, desto unnatürlicher schien es mir. Kein Glanz, kein Orange. Alles Licht längst aufgesogen. Kein Rabe, keine Kohle, keine Tiefe. Nur noch schwarz. Das Fenster würde nichts als Attrappe sein. Ger drückte die Zigarette aus und zündete sich eine neue an.
‘Schön, so eine Stille.’ Er genoß die Minuten mit mir allein. Sie werden Katja und Aleksej fragen, warum wir rüber wollten, sie werden mit jedem einzeln in einen fensterlosen Raum gehen, das Kind auf einen Stuhl setzen und sagen: Wir wollen etwas wissen und du mußt uns die Wahrheit sagen, hörst du? Und Katja wird nicken, und Aleksej auf seine Schuhe schauen. Sieh mich an, wird der Mann im Staatsdienst zu Aleksej sagen. Er wird ihm dabei auf den Rücken klopfen, wie einem Kumpel, einem Kollegen, einem Vertrauten.
6.

 
LAGERFEUER — JULIA FRANCK

Und nicht wissen, das Aleksej ihn, auch wenn er den Kopf hob, nur schemenhaft sehen konnte, weil seine Brille nicht mehr viel taugte. Er sah gerne auf seine Schuhe, sie waren dasjenige, das sich am weitesten von seinen Augen entfernt befand und dennoch zu ihm gehörte, von den Schuhen wußte er genau, wie sie aussahen. Vielleicht wird der Beambte ihm drohen, vielleicht an seinem Arm reißen, damit Aleksej nicht vergißt, um wieviel stärker einer wie er war. Vielleicht standen sie zu dritt vor Aleksej, zu fünft, der ganze Raum könnte voll sein von Staatsdienern in Uniform, Volkspolizisten, Angehörigen der Staatssicherheit, Grenzsoldaten, Oberen, Lehrlingen, Helfern – aber dann verlöre der einzelne an Autorität. Was will eure Mutter drüben? Kennt sie den Mann schon lange? Liebt sie den Mann? Habt ihr gesehen, ob er sie küßt? Und sie ihn? Wie küssen sie sich? Wollt ihr so einen Vater aus dem Westen? Hat er euch Geschenke mitgebracht? Welche? Also ist er ein Kapitalist. Nicht wahr? Schweigen. Was konnte Aleksej darauf schon antworten. Es gab nur falsche Antwordtn. Etwas züngelte am Ende meines Rückgrats, ich könnte es Furcht nennen, aber es war nur ein Züngeln. Falsche Antworten. Nicht einmal das wußte Aleksej, vielleicht ahnte er es.
7.

 
LAGERFEUER — JULIA FRANCK

Werden sie uns festhalten? Was zählte schon das Papier, die Genehmigung, wenn sie mich einfach verschwinden ließen, ganz und gar, und die Kinder in ein Heim steckten? Zwangsadoption. Darüber gab es Gerüchte. Insbesondere Feinde des Landes, aber auch Feinde der sozialistischen Demokratie und ganz besonders solche, die sich davonmachten, flohen, das waren diejenigen, deren Kinder in den Schutz des Staates geholt wurden Unwiederbringlich und unauffindbar.
8.


     
The Ledge
editor-in-chief: Stacey Knecht, info@the-ledge.com
Thanks to: De digitale pioniers and
Het Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds
Design: Maurits de Bruijn

Copyright: Pieter Steinz, Stacey Knecht
All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical means, including information storage and retrieval systems, without permission in writing from the author.