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Mark Z. Danielewski
1966 • American writer


photo: Roeland Fossen

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Mark Z. Danielewski got his first taste of fiction writing at 1O. ‘I wrote a book about a New York kid who becomes a cocaine addict, beats up a cop and goes to prison,’ he says. ‘My parents were shocked. My father thought it was immoral. And a teacher of mine in Utah called it a dirty book – it had the word "fuck" in it. After that, it took me a long while before I would show my work around.’ At Yale, he studied English Literature and got rejected from every writing seminar he applied for. He went on to UC Berkeley, where he did an intensive Latin program. Shortly afterwards, Danielewski headed off to Paris for a year, living on almost no money and writing constantly. Film school in LA followed. Then his father, an experimental filmmaker who had led the family to exotic locates around the globe, died. ‘That shook the foundations of a lot of things, ‘ he says. ‘I worked at a restaurant, tutoring kids, as a plumber - all the while writing. That's always been my source.’
Once the book was finished, he quickly found a publisher. House of Leaves was published in the US in March, 2000.
Mark Z. Danielewski is now working on his second novel.
bookweb  
BOOKS BY MARK Z. DANIELEWSKI:

The Fifty Year Sword
2005
–› Excerpt

A ghost story.
ON MARK Z. DANIELEWSKI'S BOOKSHELF

Fictions
Jorges Luis Borges, 1935/ 1944 / 1949
Labyrinthian tales.

House of Leaves
2000
When Johnny Truant attempts to organize the many fragments of a strange manuscript by a dead blind man, it gains possession of his very soul.
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